Music

Our Teaching Staff

Head of Department Music Teacher
Mr M Allen Miss Z Joanes

 Peripetetic Teaching Staff

Guitar Teacher: Mr B Butterworth
Woodwind Teacher: Mr K Bereen
Brass Teacher: Mr M Woodhurst
Keyboard and Piano Teacher: Mr K Ewins
Strings Teacher: Ms T McGrahan
Music at St. Catherines allows student to explore the world of sound through creative, engaging lessons and extra-curricular activities. We engage students through 4 key areas: performance, composition, listening & appraising and The Language of Music. Music is not only creative and expressive, but instils a deep sense of discipline and commitment in our students. Our subject provides opportunities for students to offer service to the school through concerts, choirs, orchestra, instrumental lessons and a wide variety of trip.

Key Stage 3 

Main Skills developed in Year 7:

  • Developing instrumental skills (all ability levels)
  • Working and performing with others as an ensemble
  • Reading music and understanding notation
  • The Elements of Music (introduced)
  • Listening and appraising a variety of styles and time periods
 

Year 7

1

"Bassline Assessment (SELSA)"

Assessment: The Language of Music

What Do I know about Music?

Exploring and expressing

2

"Discovering Music"

Assessment: Performance

Playing an instrument, reading music

Piano and keyboard techniques

3

"Scores and Notation"

Assessment: Composing

Reading a score, understanding symbols

Composing a melody with accompaniment

4

"Timbre"

Assessment: Listening and Appraising

The world of sonority (sound)

Orchestra and other ensembles

5

"Traditional Music"

Assessment: Composing

The origins of music in Great Britain

Medieval music

6

"Samba Ensembles"

Assessment: Performance

Understanding rhythm and polyrhythm

Playing as a large ensemble

Main Skills developed in Year 8:

  • Developing composition and notation skills using scores
  • Appreciating music from other cultures
  • How to use Rondo, Ternary and Binary forms
  • Developing harmony and chord writing.
  • Appreciating how music can tell a story
 

Year 8

1

"Melody"

Assessment: Composition

Developing an accurate melody

Composing for my instrument

2

"Structure"

Assessment: Performance

Core forms and structures in music

Structural devices and techniques

3

"Harmony and Chords"

Assessment: The Language of Music

Major / minor and 7th chords

How to create a chord yourself

4

"Ballads"

Assessment: Performance

Telling stories through music

Writing lyrics for a composed melody

5

"Indian music and Bhangra"

Assessment: Listening and Appraising

Learning about Indian scale and melody

Understanding cultures around the world

6

"Japanese Music"

Assessment: Performance

Developing performance technique

Exploring structures from other cultures

Main Skills developed in Year 9:

  • Using advanced structures such as 12 Bar Blues and Pop
  • Appreciating how industry affects music
  • Using technology to compose music i.e. “Cubase” Digital Audio Workstation
  • Understanding music history
 

Year 9

1

"12 Bar Blues"

Assessment: Performance

12 Bar Blues structure and improvisation

Blues instruments and the slave trade

2

"Film and Computer Game Music"

Assessment: Composition

Ensemble composition and performance

Composing for the media industry

3

"Popular Music"

Assessment: Performance

Pop structure and popular styles

How to write pop riffs and hooks

4

"Western Classical Music"

Assessment: The Language of Music

Understanding classical styles

Introducing Minimalism

5

"Dance Music (Cubase) 1"

Assessment: The Language of Music

How to compose using technology

Understanding the role of the producer

Linked Assessment

6

"Dance Music (Cubase) 2"

Assessment: Composition

Structuring dance music in any style

Developing techniques and skills using technology

Key Stage 4 

Course Content:

At GCSE, our course is arranged in a similar way to years 7, 8 and 9. The three main areas continue to be

  • Understanding Music (Listening and Appraising)
  • Performing
  • Composing

Exam Board and Qualification: AQA GCSE Music

 

What’s Assessed?

How?

 

Component 1: Understanding music
(40%)

Listening

Contextual understanding

Exam paper with listening
exercises and written questions using excerpts of music.

Questions

Section A: Listening – unfamiliar music (68 marks)
Section B: Study pieces (28 marks)

The exam is 1 hour and 30 minutes.

This component is worth 40% of GCSE marks (96 marks).

 

What’s Assessed?

How?

 

Component 2: Performing music
(30%)

Music performance (solo and in a group) using voice or instruments

As an instrumentalist and/or vocalist and/or via technology:

Performance 1: Solo performance (36 marks)

Performance 2: Ensemble performance (36 marks).

A minimum of four minutes of performance in total is required, of which a minimum of one minute must be the ensemble performance.

This component is 30% of GCSE marks (72 marks).

Non-exam assessment (NEA) will be internally marked by teachers and externally moderated by AQA.

 

What’s Assessed?

How?

 

Component 3: Composing music
(30%)

Composition  (regularly achieved using CUBASE, building on skills from year 9)

Composition 1: Composition to a brief (36 marks)

Composition 2: Free composition (36 marks).

A minimum of three minutes of music in total is required.

This component is 30% of GCSE marks (72 marks).

Non-exam assessment (NEA) will be internally marked by teachers and externally moderated by AQA.

What will I study?

Western classical tradition 1650 – 1910

The Coronation Anthems and Oratorios of Handel.
The orchestra music of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven.
The piano music of Chopin and Schumann.
The Requiem of the late Romantic period.

Study piece

Haydn: Symphony 101 in D major The Clock, movement. 2

Reading staff notation

Students must be able to identify musical elements when reading short passages of unfamiliar music in staff notation of up to 12 bars.

Writing staff notation

Students must be able to demonstrate the ability to write staff notation within short passages of up to eight bars:

  • Melodically up to four sharps and flats
  • Rhythmically including simple and compound time.

Chords

Students must learn major and minor chords and be able to identify them in aural and written form.
Examples of relevant types of chords can be found in the musical elements table

Musical vocabulary and terminology

Students must be able to identify and apply appropriate musical vocabulary and terminology

Popular music
 

Music of Broadway 1950s to 1990s.
Rock music of 1960s and 1970s.
Film and computer gaming music 1990s to present.
Pop music 1990s to present.

Traditional music
 

Blues music from 1920–1950.
Fusion music incorporating African and/or Caribbean music.
Contemporary Latin music.
Contemporary folk music of the British Isles.
Study piece
Santana: Supernatural – the following three tracks: Smooth, Migra, Love of my Life.

Western classical tradition since 1910.

 The orchestral music of Copland.
British music of Arnold, Britten, Maxwell-Davies and Tavener.
The orchestral music of Zoltán Kodály and Béla Bartók.
Minimalist music of John Adams, Steve Reich and Terry Riley.

 

Reading staff notation

Students must be able to identify musical elements when reading short passages of staff notation of up to 12 bars.

Chords and chord symbols

Students must learn major and minor chords and their associated symbols and be able to identify them in aural and written form. Examples of relevant types of chords and symbols can be found in the musical elements tables.

Musical vocabulary and terminology

Students must be able to identify and apply appropriate musical vocabulary and terminology to music heard and notated. The appropriate vocabulary required can be found in the tables relevant to the area of study.

 

Useful Information:

Website links:

http://virtualpiano.net/
http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/music/gcse/music-8271
https://www.musictheory.net/lessons
https://www.musictheory.net/exercises
https://www.musicroom.com/
https://www.studiospares.com/
http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/topics/zdxh34j
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/content.php?r=3040-GCSE-music

A background education in Music is useful for the following careers:

  • Session performer in voice or instrument
  • Composer
  • Producer
  • Musical Director
  • DJ
  • Music Business i.e. record label owner / A&R / Publishing
  • Music Teacher
  • Recording engineer

Further Information

If you would like to find out more about the Music curriculum, please contact Mr Allen at:

admin@stccg.co.uk